Explore Philadelphia

Philadelphia: Persons and Places

Who? When? Where? and Why? These are the questions to be answered when exploring Philadelphia. Once colonial America's premier city, it fell from its political prominence in 1800 following the move of the federal Seat of Government to the Potomac region. Its commercial hegemony fell behind that of upstart Baltimore while by the Civil War its financial hegemony and nearly all other aspects fell behind that of New York. Reborn as the industrial capital, it had its greatest day at the time of the 1876 American Centennial. The age of steam upon which it was based has now been replaced by that of information. It takes great pride in its history for craftsmanship and innovation as it strives for renewal in the future.

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Philadelphia: Persons and Places

Explore the people and events that shaped the Yankee City

Boston: Persons and Places

Boston was the first of the great ports on the eastern seaboard. Before New York, Philadelphia or Baltimore, it was a town perched on the edge of the continent. By 1700, it ranked third among British ports behind London and Bristol. It remained the largest town of British North America until 1760 when, limited by its site on a narrow peninsula, it was bypassed by Philadelphia and then New York.

We explore the history of this relatively small yet significant world city from its founding in the 17th century through its contribution to American independence in the 18th century and then in the 19th century to its cultural flowering before the Civil War and its leadership in the Union cause during the war itself. It fell behind in the era of large scale industrialization both in wealth and influence. It leads once again in the late 20th century extending into the 21st when the Information Revolution has taken the place of the earlier one based on energy and machines.

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Boston: Persons and Places

Post-War DC

Washington DC: The World Capital in The American Century 1941-1990

Washington DC and the American Century continues Mark N. Ozer’s perusal of the history and development of the Nation’s Capital. This volume examines how the capital was affected—and reflected—the role of the United States as the leading world power of the 20th century. It speaks about how it became a capital city that strove to represent “the spirit of a constitutional republic and the epitome of enlightened capitalism.” As in his other books, readers will find Ozer’s latest offering to be marked by “a keen ability to relate politics, architecture, and urban development together in concise, pithy, and insightful discussions.

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Washington DC: The World Capital in The American Century 1941-1990

Building the National Shrine

Washington DC
The National Shrine: 1890 - 1940

We explore the questions of Who? Why? When? and Where? in Washington DC at a crucial time in its history. Its physical growth has reflected the centralization that has occurred as the republic has evolved in its power and complexity. At its centennial as the Seat of Government in 1900, following a short triumphant war, the United States entered a new era. Its government would also be remade in the spirit of the Progressive movement to meet the challenges of industrial mobilization tested in the crucial participation in a world war. It would meet a national economic crisis in which industrial capitalism was found wanting and the city took on new respomsibilities. By 1940, it had clearly become an international power while its national capital had been remade to fulfill its new role in line to become a world capital.

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Washington DC - The National Shrine: 1890 - 1940

The National Capital

Washington DC and the Civil War

The Civil War was clearly the central event in the history both of the United States and the development of Washington DC. Once again during the sesquicentennial, the events from Fort Sumter to Appomattox have been re-enacted at their various sites. The question remains as to what the Civil War actually represents; that battle continues. Is it a story of military battles or of emancipation? The two narratives do not readily co-exist.

The war marked the change in the United States from a plural to a singular noun. The wartime Chief Executive enabled the abolition of black slavery and the deposition of the entire social order of half the country. The Legislature was freed by the withdrawal of the representatives of the seceding states. They who had jealously guarded states rights no longer prevented the development of a national currency and banking system, nor a transcontinental railroad that crossed the middle of the country.

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Washington DC and the War of 1812

Rising from the Ashes

Washington DC and the War of 1812

It was the new national capital striving to find its rationale in its few public buildings. It was a Seat of Government where a weak executive failed to control a fractious legislature even while fighting at its distant borders a war against the world's Great Power. It then became itself a Seat of War. After its destruction and a peace snatched out of the depths of defeat, there was a renewal of national feeling. The more emphatic restatement of the city's significance and reinstatement of its Public Buildings have continued to reverberate in the history of the city and in our national life.

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Washington DC and the War of 1812

Explore the interaction of geography and history.
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Washington, DC: Politics And Place

Who, Why, What, Where and When - these are important questions that you want to know when visiting or living in Washington, DC. This unique book incorporates the city’s historical background and the people associated with important sites that one can see today. Each chapter explores the changes that occurred and how the buildings express the politics of their time.

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Washington, D.C.: Politics and Place

Walking in the Steps of History

Washington DC Streets and Statues

Who are the persons whose familiar names are part of our everyday lives as we live and visit on the streets of Washington? Why are they there? When did they appear and for what reason? This book deals with the design of the city to reflect its purpose as the capital city of a great country to embody that country and its history; and then of its subsequent role as a world capital to reflect the principles that make it so important to people the world over. People interested in the national capital –tourists, students, recent or long time residents—can all learn the fascinating story of the country’s history as expressed in its street names and statues. This book provides a broad perspective about the history and design of Washington DC that is both highly interesting and accurate.

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Washington, D.C.: Politics and Place

Explore the history of the Washington DC subway system

Washington Metroland

This book tells the story of the Metro system as part of the story of the Washington region. When first conceived and built in the 1960s, Washington DC was the national capital of a great country at a time when it was at its most prosperous. There was a consistent design throughout the system in accordance with the monumentality of the national capital. Now fifty years after its original design and thirty-five years after the opening of its first stations, it is second in ridership only to the far larger New York transit system. . We follow the existing and projected Metro lines after describing their origins in the roadways and the rail systems that largely preceded them. After considering the central transfer stations as an entity, each station on a line is described. The lives of significant personages provide a focus for the history of each station as we also explore its recent development as an urban node.

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Washington Metroland

Explore the people and events that shaped Charm City

Baltimore: Persons and Places

Who? Where? When? and Why? These are the questions to be answered when exploring Baltimore. A great port on the east coast connected to the Mid-west; it was also a major industrial city. The Gateway to the South, it is both a southern and northern city, split during the Civil War and for the next one hundred years. It was unique among American cities as a home for the Great Migrations of both blacks and whites in both the 19th and 20th centuries. It still remains a place “for good living,” where the grittiness of its people offer hope for its redemption in the 21st century.

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Baltimore: Persons and Places