Explore the interaction of geography and history.
Read the entire story in

Washington, DC: Politics And Place

Mark N. Ozer

Who, Why, What, Where and When - these are important questions that you want to know when visiting or living in Washington, DC. This unique book incorporates the city’s historical background and the people associated with important sites that one can see today. Each chapter explores the changes that occurred and how the buildings express the politics of their time.

Explore each era, starting in the 1790s when it was the “Seat of Government” of the Revolutionary Generation; then from the 1830s onward as the straggly “Federal City;” and finally during the 1860s when the Civil War, Reconstruction and Gilded Age made it truly the “National Capital” and the site for the “American Renaissance.”

Following its centennial in 1900, during the Progressive era and then New Deal, the Capital became the epitome of the City Beautiful and the American shrine. After World War II, following the era of the Cold War, by the time of its bicentennial in 2000, it became the International Capital and a City representative of a more inclusive sense of America.

In this splendid guide to Washington DC’s places and history, Ozer walks the reader at a brisk, always illuminating, pace through the early days of the capital city’s beginnings as a political compromise through its evolution from provincial backwater to world power center. Ozer uses Washington’s architecture as trail markers to chart the community’s progress. This is a book to hand visitors or to take along yourself on a ramble through unexplored parts of the city.

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1 The Revolutionary Generation/Federal Seat of Government (1790-1830)
    • 1.1. Establishing a Federal Seat of Government
      • Selection of a Site
    • 1.2. The Design of the Site
    • 1.3. The Public Buildings
      • The President’s House
      • The Bulfinch Old Capitol Building
      • The Executive Offices
  • Chapter 2 The Ante-Bellum Era/ The Federal City (1830-1860)
    • 2.1. Washington as Capital
      • The Washington Monument
      • The Executive Office Buildings
        • The Department of Treasury Building
        • The Old Patent Office
        • The U.S. Post Office
      • The Capitol Extension
      • The Smithsonian Institution
    • 2.2. Washington as a City
  • Chapter 3 The Gilded Age/ The National Capital (1860-1900)
    • 3.1. Washington as Capital
      • The Capital of Northern Hegemony
      • The Executive Buildings
      • The Library of Congress/A Temple of Learning
    • 3.2. Washington as City
      • The Washington Aqueduct
      • The Governance of Washington
      • Frederick Douglass and Reconstruction
      • An Initial Cultural Life
      • Building the City
  • Chapter 4 The Progressive Era/The City Beautiful (1900-1930)
    • 4.1. Washington as Capital
      • The McMillan Commission
      • The Development of the Mall
      • The Commission of Fine Arts
        • The Federal Triangle
        • The Grant Memorial
        • The Lincoln Memorial
      • The White House
    • 4.2. Washington as a City
      • The Park Commission
      • Cultural Life Enhanced
      • Building the City
  • Chapter 5. The New Deal/ The National Nerve Center (1930-1960)
    • 5.1. Washington as Capital
      • The Bonus March
      • The Executive buildings
        • The White House Enlarged
        • The Department of Agriculture
        • The Department of the Interior
        • The Federal Trade Commission
      • Women’s Suffrage
      • The Jefferson Memorial
      • The Supreme Court
      • The Lincoln Memorial Revisited
      • War Mobilization
        • The National Airport
        • The Pentagon
        • The Bethesda Naval Hospital
      • War Memorials
        • The Iwo Jima Monument
        • World War II Memorial
        • Franklin Roosevelt Memorial
    • 5.2. Washington as a City
      • Building the City
      • Cultural Life Further Enhanced
  • Chapter 6 The Pax Americana /The World Capital City (1960-2000)
    • 6.1. Washington as an International Capital
      • A Center for Intellectual Life
      • The International Presence
      • The War Memorials
      • The National Mall Revisited
        • The National Museum of American History
        • The Hirschhorn Museum
        • The National Air and Space Museum
      • The East Gallery of the National Gallery of Art
      • Pennsylvania Avenue Revisited
      • The Executive Offices
        • Lafayette Square
        • The White House
    • 6.2. The City as the Capital of the Free World
      • Julius Hobson and Black Politics
      • The March on Washington Revisited
      • Religious Life
      • Cultural Life Achieved
      • Rebuilding the City
      • Washington as a Regional City
  • List of Figures
  • Index